The Jazz Composers Collective on Creating and Performing

The Jazz Composers Collective on Creating and Performing

Jazz Composers Collective: Clip #7 FRANK J. OTERI: How do you feel when other people play your music? You talked about writing for your specific groups. Have there been a lot of instances of other groups out there playing your things… FRANK KIMBROUGH: It’s funny. I’ve had a few instan ces of that happening, not… Read more »

Written By

Frank J. Oteri

Frank J. Oteri is an ASCAP-award winning composer and music journalist. Among his compositions are Already Yesterday or Still Tomorrow for orchestra, the "performance oratorio" MACHUNAS, the 1/4-tone sax quartet Fair and Balanced?, and the 1/6-tone rock band suite Imagined Overtures. His compositions are represented by Black Tea Music. Oteri is the Vice President of the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM) and is Composer Advocate at New Music USA where he has been the Editor of its web magazine, NewMusicBox.org, since its founding in 1999.


Jazz Composers Collective: Clip #7

FRANK J. OTERI: How do you feel when other people play your music? You talked about writing for your specific groups. Have there been a lot of instances of other groups out there playing your things…

FRANK KIMBROUGH: It’s funny. I’ve had a few instan
ces of that happening, not many. Three or four people that have wanted to record one of my tunes.

FRANK J. OTERI: And what’s that been like?

FRANK KIMBROUGH: It’s very nice. I don’t really think of myself as like a composer’s composer. I think of myself really as an amateur. I think it’s important, in a sense, to have a sense of… not in the sense of amateurish, but in the sense of, you know, what does amateur mean? It means someone who loves to do something, right? That’s the literal translation of the word, that’s what it is. I don’t do it thinking that way, you know? So when somebody comes up and says, “Hey, I like this tune. I’d like to do it on my record,” I’m thrilled.

TED NASH: It’s funny to hear a version of your tune.

FRANK KIMBROUGH: Yeah.

TED NASH: Is that what they’re hearing? [everyone laughs] Ingrid Jensen recorded “Longing,” and it was just so interesting, you know? She left out a big section, and she heard this part of it. She just wanted to interpret certain things. But I was completely thrilled that she wanted to do it, and it sounded beautiful the way she did it.